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Update on Teen Spree from YCSO 2/18/2018

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Dear Neighbors 
Since the original report of a break in attempt in Montezuma Estates, five more instances possibly identifying the same suspects have been sent to us.  Dwight D’Evelyn, YCSO Media Relations Coordinator, reports: “I requested xtra patrol in the area. If suspicious activity is seen, please call the Sheriff’s Office (567-7710) first before posting/emailing the information to neighbors.
 
Also, would you PLEASE remind residents to LOCK THEIR CARS WHEN UNATTENDED, especially overnight. We cannot seem to get ahead of the many opportunist crimes allowed as a result of the failure to use such a simple crime prevention technique.”
 
We have two or three teenagers whose behaviors may lead to someone getting hurt or damage to property.  If you know who they are, please let YCSO know.  There needs to be an intervention soon for the safety of all.
The original report is at the bottom of this email and the other sightings follow.
Be safe!  Please lock your vehicle doors and home windows and doors.
the calendar crew
Additional Reports of Possible Sightings in Lake Montezuma & Rimrock

Yesterday, 2-17, three young men ran across the rooftop of the Lake Montezuma Village Post Office and Adult Center. They were seen from behind.  Two may have been the ones from the original break in.  One wore a red hoodie.

 

On Saturday 2/17/18 in Montezuma Haven two teenagers opened our gate and came onto our property one came to our back door and knocked lightly, When the door was answered he asked if he could have fifty cents or a dollar.   A second individual had made his way toward the front of our house and was standing out of sight, when he was observed both individuals were advised to leave the property immediately.  Both subjects where wearing knee length shorts one had light colored hair and was dressed in camouflage wearing a gray hoodie.  The second subject had dark curly hair and was wearing a red head band.  The police were notified.

These two live in the neighborhood (Montezuma Estates). I see them walking around all the time. Kind of surprised me actually.  When my wife arrived home from work, she reminded me that the boy with the curly hair actually knocked on our door on Sunday, Jan 6th, just to ask me the time. He acted weird, and I thought it was strange, but never gave it another thought. Now I am a bit more suspicious of the activity, and realize that I haven’t seen them in a few days. They usually walk by the house daily.

The description of the two boys sound similar to a situation on last Sunday afternoon in the Lake Montezuma off Lakeview.
My friend gave me a copy of yesterday’s report about the attempted Break In – it caught my attention as on the night of January 28/morning 29 – someone went into my car, in my driveway and took my NFL 49er jacket (was reported to Sheriff).  What caught my attention was the red hoodie.  When talking with one of my neighbors on the 29th she told me that on the 28th, she got home from work between 11 and 11:30 and was on her patio when she saw 2 males walking up the road – one wearing a red hoodie – when she lit her cigarette they turned around and walked back they way they came.  I am thinking these two have a little crime spree going on.  I think everyone should be aware of what going on.

Break In Attempt in Montezuma Estates
NOTICE:  submitted by a Montezuma Estates resident in Rimrock  (Name on file)

2-12-18 

This morning two young men, possibly teenagers, tried to
break in through a window of our home on Kramer. They went removed the screen from the window before being confronted at the window.  Prior to this, they had rung the doorbell about 30 times. They have black hair, at least one with curly hair and darker skin.  One of them was wearing a red hoodie. The Sheriff’s office has been notified.

Please keep an eye out for them, and lock all your windows and doors, and call the Sheriff if you see or experience anything suspicious.

- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 
YCSO Sheriff’s Office phone #:  567-7710
Please call this number if you have information.

 

Beaver Creek eNews 2/12/2018

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Beaver Creek eNewsFebruary 12, 2018
Dear Neighbors
Rain has been requested by the community and is expected to be received in Beaver Creek today and possibly on several other days this week.  Week long highs in the fifties and lows above freezing have been forecasted by NWS.  So please get your burn permits from the fire station and take care of your slash before more grows.
The LM Women’s Civic club is meeting tomorrow to enjoy lunch while collecting baby blankets and other items to donate to the hospital.  Their fun tea fundraiser will be on the 24th which will help to support community projects such as a scholarship to a Beaver Creek School student.  This weekend several activities and meetings are scheduled.  Of special note are the Beaver Creek Adult Center pot luck and the Habitat for Humanities Workshop to be held at BC School. 
Please check out the “Good Things are Happening at Beaver Creek School”.  The field trips, high school and college planning, and healthy activities scheduled by school staff and community volunteers are mind blowing to someone who still remembers the one kindergarten field trip and one 8th grade trip offered in the calendar crew’s schooling.
Up coming on March 1 is the annual Kiwanis Chili & Pie Dinner and on March 10, VV Ancestral Gardens supported by BC Kiwanis is sponsoring a Beaver Creek Rd cleanup.  More on these events next week.
The APS rate increase has been a hot topic for several months after many residents received nearly a doubling of electric bills which was not the advertised rate.  As it happens, it takes 25 review requests from the public to require the Arizona Corporation Commission to schedule a rehearing.  The initial hearing on the rate increase is scheduled for 2/15 at 1:30 PM.  It is a procedural conference for the formal complaint: Stacy Champion, et al, versus Arizona Public Service.
While the rehearing request on the APS rate increase has been in the works, APS requested on January 9 that the ACC approve a $119 rate reduction to customers to start on February 1.  The request is based on Federal corporation tax cuts.  No word yet on when ACC will schedule and approve this request.  Meanwhile, it is recommended that customers who have had particularly large rate increases call the number on their bills and make sure that the best rate category is being used for billing.
Happy for the chance of rain,
. . . . . the calendar crew 
February Special EventsBC Adult Center
Saturday, 2/17–The Beaver Creek Adult Center Pot Luckbegins at 5 PM.   Please bring your plate (if you forget, we have paper plates) and utensils, a dish to share, and a friend.  Drinks will be provided.  Everyone is welcome to attend.  Door prizes and auction, too.  (See flyer below)
 
Saturday, 2/17–The Verde Valley Habitat for Humanity Workshop  is hosted at Beaver Creek School from 9 AM to Noon. You must attend if you are interested in becoming a Habitat Homeowner.  (See flyer below)
Wednesdays, 2/21-3/21–The Lent Soup, Supper & Service   starts at 6 PM in the Grace Community Lutheran Church.  Please call 928-567-4608 for more information.
Thursday, 2/22–The STEAM Extravaganza will be held at Beaver Creek School from 6:30 PM to 8 PM. $1 per dinner.
Saturday, 2/24–The Lake Montezuma Women’s Civic Club Tea will be from 2 PM to 4 PM in the Beaver Creek School Cafetorium.   Get your tickets now!  There will also be a fashion show, an auction and silent auction.  Tickets are $20 and limited to 75.  Tea attire is expected.  Tickets are available from Betty Hart 928-567-2946, Rachel Ayars 719-330-9346, Alberta Amos 928-567-4892, Darla Melcher 928-592-0782 and any civic club member.  This is a fundraiser for a beaver creek student scholarship and to support local community organizations.  Mark your calendar!  (See flyer below)
Regularly Scheduled Meetings & Activities February 12 to 17  
Monday, 2/12–The Rimrockers  will meet at 11:30 AM  at Diana Bell’s home for a pot luck and meeting.  Please call Diana Bell at 928-567-9113 to confirm your attendance and get directions to her home.
Monday, 2/12-The Beaver Creek Community Association (BCCA)  meets at 3:00 PMin the BC Adult Center.  BCCA helps to provide information, representation in Yavapai County, maintain Rollins Park, participate in and sponsor community projects.  Selection of arborist for Rollins Park tree trimming and Rimrock Well No. 3 Administrative Review w/Comment on APN#405-05-110 & -014A; H18004 at this meeting.  Please contact Janet Aniol at 928-592-2839 for further information.   www.beavercreekaz.us   
 
Monday, 2/12–The Beaver Creek School Governing Board  meets at 6:00 PM in the school board room. Board members are:  Jackie Harshman, president; Jo Burke; Karen DuFresne; Betty Hart; and Perry Krowne.  The agenda will be posted at several sites locally and is also at: www.bcs.k12.az.us 
 
Tuesday, 2/13–The BC Kiwanis  meet at 7:30 AM in the BC Adult Center Library.  We will discuss January and February activities.  Please call Carol Keeton at 928-606-4050 for more information. www.bckiwanis.org 
Tuesday, 2/13–The  Lake Montezuma Women’s Civic Club meets at Grace Community Lutheran Church from 11 AM to 1 PM    The program will be presented by the Social Worker in Obstetrics at Verde Valley Medical Center, talking about the resources for young mothers in the area. All women in the community are invited.  Members are asked to bring not only baby blankets to donate to the hospital, but also any additional items they may want to donate to the auction being held with the tea event on February 24 .  Cost $13.  Contact Chair Marie Kraetz, president, at (928) 567-4832 for more information.
Tuesday, 2/13-The MRFD Auxiliary meets at 11 AM at the Montezuma Rimrock Fire Station.  The Montezuma Rimrock Fire Auxiliary is putting together a cook book as a fund raiser. If you would like to contribute a recipe or two, please email recipe to me at grambo_3@msn.com   and put Recipe as subject. Hope to get some good recipes from all you great local cooks!
Tuesdays, All-The Creative Movement Classes meet in the BC Adult Center from 9 to 9:45 AM.  The Chair Yoga classes meet from 5:30 to 6:15 PM.  Please call Pamela Zahnzinger at 928-592-9114 for further information.
 
Wednesday, 2/14–The Blood Pressure Clinic  is available the second Wednesday of each month in the BC Adult Center from 9:30 AM to 11 AM.  Come get your blood pressure taken by Sue Brann, RN.
Thursday, 2/15–The Montezuma Rimrock Fire Board  meets during a 9 AM to Noonsession for the MRFD, CVFD, and CCF&M Fire Boards at the Camp Verde Fire Station this month.  Call Robyn Cook at 928-567-9401 for further information.  Don’t forget that you can find past minutes and the current agenda on the web site at  http://cc-fma.org/
Thursday, 2/15–The Friends of Beaver Creek Library Board  will meet at  4 PM at the Beaver Creek School Public Library. TREK FOR TECH plans are underway and we look forward to a successful Fun Run/Walk on March 24th. Watch for signs and info mid-February and join the fun. A great family event !  Contact Judy McBride at 928-567-4648 for more information.
Saturday, 2/18–The Men’s Breakfast  at the Beaver Creek Baptist Church welcomes new friends and old at 8 AM. Please call Pastor Ken Miller at 928-567-4557 for further information.
Saturday, 2/18–Bird Walks at Montezuma Well  will be hosted by NPS from 9 AM to 11 AM the first and third Saturdays through April 2018.  Meet at the Montezuma Well picnic area.  For more information please contact NPS at 928-567-3322, ext 0.
Saturday, 2/18–The Lutheran Women’s Missionary League meets at 10 AM at Grace Lutheran Community Church. The function of this church auxiliary is to help members of the community. Please call 928-567-4608 for further information.
The Good Things Happening at Beaver Creek School
January 2018
 
News release:  Mrs. Karin Ward, Superintendent at Beaver Creek School
Our STEAM Extravaganza is rapidly approaching. It will be held on February 22. Students are working hard to understand and use the scientific method, and teachers are supporting their efforts through guided practice. Teachers are also organizing activities for parents, students, and community members.
 
Friday 2/9 will be the Verde Valley In-Service day for teachers. Beaver Creek School is hosting the discussion on new topics and trends in special education. We are also sending teachers to schools around the Verde Valley to learn and discuss ideas with other educators. This collaborative effort to grow as professionals gives us all a chance to reflect, learn, and revise our practice.
Beaver Creek School welcomed our new student teacher Mr. Jeff Reeves this quarter. He is working with Mrs. Cheryl Guth in her fourth grade class. He is doing a great job, absorbing information and supporting students daily.
Mrs. Allie Wheeler has been working with Mrs. Micca Martinez to get the 2018 season of Jr. Basketball up and running. Mrs. Martinez created the program and is helping to transition it to Mrs. Wheeler. They have both worked hard to make sure our kids have the opportunity to play. We are very excited to welcome first though fourth grade students to the 2018 season of Jr. Basketball. We have several parents volunteering to coach. Thank you to coaches and families for your cooperation and enthusiasm for this program.
Mrs. Pam Zahnzinger will be holding auditions for her upcoming drama production on 2/13 and 2/16. She is working on this performance as a partner with our 21st Century program. She put on a wonderful play last year. The district staff is  certainly happy to see her working with our kids once again.
Mrs. Betsy Ciminieri is forming a running club in partnership with our 21st Century program. She will use running to fuel conversations about healthy habits, keeping a balanced lifestyle and building self-esteem. Welcome Coach Betsy!
Baseball and softball season are off to a great start. Coaches Hardy, Kelley, and O’Brien are working with their players to build their teams. The players are excited to begin playing! Go Bobcats!
We have out third wellness week planned and we will have guest speakers from the Health Department discussing Healthy vs. Unhealthy relationships, Safe Dates, and dating abuse.  We have officer Godina in to talk to our students K-5 about personal safety.  Mat Force will be here to talk to our students about Life Skills that include self esteem/assertiveness. The Yavapai County Health Department will talk to 5th grade about puberty and the changes their bodies are going through.  Nurses will also keep our students current on their immunizations, check heights and weights, and scoliosis.  The staff will play the 8th grade in the annual staff versus 8th grade basketball game.  We will also be celebrating spirit week with a retro theme.  Our staff and students will be encouraged to dress in the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s throughout the week.
The eighth grade toured both high schools in preparation for selecting where they will attend high school.  It is valuable for them to actually see the campuses and classes that are available to them.  It is always interesting to hear what specific opportunities and classes excite our students for next year.
On February 15th the fifth and sixth grade students get to attend Cinderella at Phoenix Symphony Hall.  This is a wonderful experience to broaden their horizons and to expose them to the fine arts, as well as, introduce all the jobs and careers that are related to the performing arts.
Upcoming field trips are to The Tempest, the Shakespeare play, the Renaissance Festival and The Maze, which is a hands-on experience related to teenage issues and concerns.
The Women’s Civic Club is once again offering a scholarship to graduating seniors who attended Beaver Creek School and live in the Beaver Creek area. The district is pleased that Mrs. Cowan is able to help some of our former students in their career and college choices.  Many begin their college careers at Yavapai College.  Our current students (7thand 8th) have already toured the campus and are aware of the programs that are offered there. This really helps them to make more educated choices that are personal and beneficial to them.
Our boys and girls basketball teams both made it to the small school State Tournament. What a wonderful accomplishment.  Go Bobcats! We have spirit yes we do!
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BCCA Annual Meeting: Good Neighbors & Diverse Opinions

The Beaver Creek Community Association held their Annual Meeting Saturday 1/27/2018.  About thirty members and area residents attended, along with Board members, County Supervisor Tom Thurman, and Jeff Thumm from Coconino National Forest.  The theme of the meeting was “Good Neighbors”. Each person attending was awgoodneighborarded a blue ribbon designation as a “Good Neighbor 2018″, because, in the end, it’s our neighbors and the people who show up at meetings that make our community a great place to live.  The meeting was upbeat, and included presentations by Jeff Thumm — who was introduced as the Forest Service manager who authorized the prescribed burn on October 24, 2017.  He presented the many factors that go into prescribed burns in a straightforward and factual way, and by the end of his talk, there were lots of questions and comments, but all present agreed that a prescribed burn once in a while is better than the alternative: wildfire!  Congratulations, Jeff, on a great presentation.

If you missed the meeting, you missed some good community conversations, as well as outstanding refreshments donated by Mike Nelson and Ron Melcher, arranged by supershoppers Sharon Olsen and Janet Aniol, and our perennial favorite secret recipe punch provided by Phil Edwards.

Long-time community leader Bob Burke was newly elected to the Board of Directors, as was Danice Bruno, an animal lover and financial wiz.  The new Directors will replace Lisa Taylor, who is now out of state, and Alan Spacone, currently undergoing chemo and therefore unable to serve on the Board in 2018.  The two new Directors were elected by acclamation, and will be valuable indeed to the BCCA.  Janet Aniol presented the financial report for 2017, an update on projects from 2017, and a transportation update, highlighting this news: the grant for bus service routes including Yavapai Transit stops from Apache Nation to McGuireville, the Ranch House, and Rimrock has been accepted and may happen this year.  2017 projects included support for the Beaver Creek Trails Coalition’s new 6.2 mile trail system on Wickiup Mesa, public meetings with Arizona Water, followed by progress on hydrants and pipe.

Board member Sharon Olsen asked for members to pitch in and help in volunteering with park maintenance duties. She reviewed bids to trim trees in the park, which will be a large budget item for the BCCA, but is badly needed for safety reasons.  Ron Melcher joined in asking residents for assistance with the fountain, gardening, clearing branches, and other park maintenance chores. Contact a Board Member if you have gardening or other skills we can use! Email : Contact Us.

President Janet Aniol circulated copies of a petition to limit Bow Hunting in our area. The petitions would be sent to Arizona Fish and Game Commission. Neighbors and residents had various opinions, from those aghast at bowhunters in their backyards, to those who support hunters, people just like everyone else, who generally respect their neighbors. There is current regulation which requires a resident to post “No Trespassing” sign or “No Hunting” sign on each lot. There were equally divergent opinions as to whether the signs were effective or reasonable in a suburban setting, and what measures could be taken by those whose property adjoins forest or open areas.  The BCCA has not taken a position on the matter, but signs are available for those who wish to post, and petitions for those who wish to sign them.

County Supervisor Tom Thurman presented the case for renewal of a 1/4 cent sales tax, devoted to maintenance of our county jail in Camp Verde.  The existing tax was passed to handle overcrowding conditions, and will expire in 2020. The renewal of the tax at the same rate, Thurman stated, is needed to provide half of the cost of maintenance to the facility, which now houses up to 600 inmates, and is currently overcrowded by as much as 60 heads per night.  Members asked questions and received solid answers to the issues from Supervisor Thurman.  For details on the jail tax proposal, click here.

Thurman also predicted a population surge in our area over the next 2-3 years, with the work on Highway 260 complete and other transportation changes making Beaver Creek more accessible. He stated that real estate values in our area have increased significantly, good news for all residents.

Check this website for the official minutes coming soon, but to get all the scoop firsthand, come out to the next Board meeting, February 12, 2018, and speak up!

 

Upper Beaver Creek Burn Planned

Upper Beaver Creek Burn
Possible Smoke in Verde Valley
Update 2017-05-01: Upper Beaver Creek (UBC) burns this week
Incident: Spring 2017 Prescribed Burns Prescribed Fire
Upcoming & Current Prescribed Burns
 
The following prescribed burns have been scheduled on the Coconino National Forest. Fire managers may need to reschedule or cancel burns based on weather and conditions. Additional prescribed burn information will be added to this list as it becomes available.
Flagstaff Ranger District
A-1: 500 acres planned for the week of May 1, likely mid-week depending on the water. A-1 Mountain area near Braken Ranch Subdivision. Smoke may settle into Belemont and Baderville.
Mogollon Rim Ranger District
UBC – Upper Beaver Creek Project (Hollingshead Mountain): Weather permitting, an additional 1,000 acres are planned for the week of May 1, continuing from last week’s burns totaling around 2,300 acres. 3,500 acres total are planned, six miles south of the Happy Jack Work Station, near Hollingshead Mountain, FRs 83 and 83A. Smoke is predicted to disperse northeast, potentially impacting Lake Mary Road. Smoke will be visible from Lake Mary Road and I-17. Cooling temperatures in the evenings may cause smoke to settle and drain down nearby canyons, potentially West Clear Creek and the Verde Valley.

Zoning Issues

Link

Land Use Violations:

To report a land use violation just dial the number below. Please describe the nature of the violation and the physical address or parcel number. You do not have to give your name if you wish to remain anonymous. The County does not actively patrol for violations and only investigates complaints it receives on the land use complaint hotline.

Yavapai County Land Use Hotline Number:  (928) 771-3464

 

A Summary of Land Use Violations and How to Report Them

 

What is a Land Use Violation?

 

Outside Storage

  • Vehicular parts
  • Appliances (unless in use)
  • Furniture not designed for outside use
  • Commercial equipment
  • Debris
  • Disabled or junk vehicles

Use Violations

  • Non-permitted businesses
  • Living in a travel trailer over 90 days a year
  • Multi-family in single family zones
  • Excessive lighting
  • Excessive livestock

Permit Violations

  • All new construction over $1,000.00 in value requires a zoning clearance
  • Structures not requiring a permit must still meet use and setback requirements
  • Work in Flood Plane requires permits
  • Most grading requires permits

Weeds and Trash

  • Excessive weeds causing a fire hazard may be addressed if the Fire Department of jurisdiction deems them a hazard

Other Violations

  • The Land Use Unit also handles the administrative abatement of failed septic systems, dangerous buildings, building code violations and flood control violations.

What is Not a Violation

  • Ugly or excessive vehicles
  • Barking dogs
  • Social nuisances or noisy activities
  • Violations of Deed Restrictions
  • Cars parked in Rights of Way
  • Weeds in ditches along Rights of Way

The Abatement Process

  • Complaint received and assigned to specialist
  • Property researched
  • Inspection performed
  • Violation verified (if applicable)
  • Property owner or occupant notifiedNotice of Violation served
  • Hearing scheduled
  • Determination by the Hearing Officer
  • Judgment generated
  • Compliance monitored
  • Appropriate referrals if warranted (Superior or Criminal Court)

Potential Penalties

  • Immediate administrative fine of $100.00
  • Typical fine of $750.00 if not in compliance with judgment within specified time frame
  • All fines are collected by either staff or collection agency
  • Judgment is recorded against property until resolved

How To Report A Land Use Violation

Reporting a possible land use violation is easy and only requires a call to the Yavapai County land use violation hot line, anonymously if you wish. To speed along the abatement process please provide a street address and parcel number. Most reported violations are investigated within ten days.

Yavapai County Land Use Hotline Number:
928-442-5458

 

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Animal Control Violations

Animal Control Safety and Violations:

To report an animal control violation just dial the number below. Please describe the nature of the violation and the physical address or parcel number. The Sheriff does not actively patrol for violations and only investigates complaints it receives.
Yavapai County Sheriff’s Number: 928-771-3260

A. Definitions

1. “AT LARGE” means being neither confined by a suitable enclosure nor physically restrained on a leash.
2. “ENFORCEMENT AGENT” means persons in Yavapai County responsible for the enforcement of this Ordinance and the regulations promulgated thereunder.
3. “OWNER” means any person owning, possessing, harboring or maintaining a dog, or any persons acting for the owner, or having charge of a dog.
4. “DOG” means member of the familiaris and domesticated wolves and offspring of dogs cross-bred with wild animals or domesticated wolves.
5. “DOG PARK” means a suitably enclosed and supervised area designated by the County or any city or town within which dogs are not required to be leashed or otherwise subject to physical restraint.

B. General Provisions

1. This Ordinance shall not apply to any incorporated city or town or to any Indian Reservation but shall apply only within the unincorporated areas of Yavapai County. The provisions of State law shall apply in those instances where this Ordinance is not equal to or more stringent than State law.
2. No dog shall be permitted at large except as provided herein. Dogs shall be confined within a suitable enclosure or otherwise physically restrained to prevent entry of dogs on public or private property other than the owner’s or on a leash not to exceed six (6) feet in length and of sufficient strength to control the dog.
3. Any dog over the age of four (4) months shall wear a collar or harness to which is attached a valid license tag. Dogs shall not be required to wear a collar or harness with a valid license attached while being used for control of livestock, or while being used or trained for hunting, while being exhibited or trained at a kennel club event, while engaged in races approved by the Arizona Racing Commission or while being transported to and from such events or races provided that they are properly vaccinated, licensed and controlled. In the event the owner can demonstrate that no approved vaccination is available a license which shall be different from a rabies tag is required.
4. It shall be unlawful for an owner or designated responsible person to maintain a dog having a propensity to bark, howl or otherwise disturb the peace and quiet of any county resident. The enforcement agency shall make every effort, including canvassing of affected neighbors, to ensure that unwarranted citations are not issued.

C. Enforcement

1. Any dog, licensed or unlicensed, which is running at large may be apprehended and impounded by the County enforcement agent. The County enforcement agent shall have the right to enter upon private property in order to apprehend any dog that has been running at large, provided the enforcement agent is in reasonable pursuit of such dog.
2. County enforcement agents and law enforcement officials may issue citations to the owner, or other person acting for the owner, when a dog is permitted to be at large. The procedure for the issuance of a notice to appear shall be as provided for peace officers in A.R.S. § 13-3903 except that the County enforcement officer shall not make an arrest before issuing the notice. The issuance of citations pursuant to this Ordinance shall be subject to the provisions of A.R.S. § 13-3899.
3. Pursuant to A.R.S. § 11-1015, it is unlawful for any person to interfere with the County enforcement agent in the performance of his duties.

D. Exemptions

1. A dog may run at large while participating in field trials, obedience classes, kennel club events, organized school or park-sponsored shows, while assisting its owner or trained in legal hunting or in herding livestock, while assisting a police officer engaged in law enforcement duties, or while assisting its blind or deaf master, so long as sufficient control is exercised permit immediate leashing of the dog upon any person’s reasonable request.
2. Dogs are allowed to occupy vehicles, including truck beds, without restraint, but as soon as a dog leaves a truck bed, it is considered to be at large

E. Special Exemption for Dog Parks

1. Upon written application by the County, or by any city or town, the Board of Supervisors may permit dogs to run without restraint within the enclosed area of a designated Dog Park subject to the condition that the
dog’s owner must remain within the enclosed area of the Dog park and exercise appropriate supervision and control at all times that a dog is allowed to run without restraint.
2. Applications for of a special exemption for a Dog Park shall be accompanied by a Development Plan to include a map and legal description of the proposed Dog Park, construction plans for all improvements to be made on the premises, procedures for maintaining the premises in a sanitary condition and a plan for staffing and supervision of the Dog Park.
3. As a condition of approval of a special exemption for a Dog Park, the applicant shall obtain a premises liability insurance policy, in a form acceptable to the County, with a minimum annual aggregate policy limit
as specified by the County which shall name the County as a primary or additional insured. The policy shall protect the County from any and all lawsuits, claims, awards or other losses, including reasonable attorney fees arising from the operation of the Dog Park. On or before the effective date of the special exemption, the applicant shall provide to the County a certificate of insurance confirming the required coverage and shall notify the County no less than 10 days prior to any changes in coverage including policy forms, policy limits, cancellations, non-renewals or changes in insurance carriers.
4. The operator of a Dog Park authorized pursuant to this Section may enact rules and regulating governing the operation of the Dog Park provided that such rules and regulations are equal to or more stringent than corresponding provisions of this Ordinance.
5. The Board of Supervisors may revoke a special exemption for a Dog Park upon a determination that the interests of the County are not served by continued operation of the Dog Park or that the public health, safety or welfare is threatened or may be threatened by continued operation of the Dog Park.

F. Biting Animals

1. The procedures set forth in A.R.S. § 11-1014 shall be followed for biting animals. Domesticated wolves and offspring of domestic animals bred with wild animals or domesticated wolves shall be considered wild animals pursuant to the provisions of A.R.S. § 11-1014(c).

G. Penalties

1. A person who is convicted of a violation of this Ordinance is guilty of a class 2 misdemeanor. As a minimum penalty , a person convicted hereunder shall to pay a fine of not less than fifty dollars, which shall not be suspended unless, at the discretion of the judge court, that person is ordered to perform and complete a minimum of eight hours of community service.
2. Any person requesting the release of an impounded dog shall provide proof of anti-rabies vaccinations and license, or shall obtain any applicable license and vaccination and shall pay for the cost of impoundment in accordance with a fee schedule adopted by the Yavapai County Board of Supervisors. Proof of ownership of the dog may be required prior to release. Any impounded dog which is not claimed within seventy-two hours shall be deemed abandoned. County enforcement agents may take possession of abandoned dogs and may place the dog for sale or may dispose of the dog in a humane manner. Any person purchasing an abandoned dog shall obtain applicable anti-rabies vaccinations and pay the applicable license and impoundment fees.

H. Repealer

Yavapai County Ordinance No. 1991-2 is hereby repealed

I. Effective Date

This Ordinance, including the repealer contained herein shall be effective October 5, 2000.
Passed and adopted by the Yavapai County Board of Supervisors this 5th day of September, 2000.
/s/ A.G. “Chip” Davis A. G. “Chip” Davis, Chairman Yavapai County Board of Supervisors
ATTEST:
/s/ Bev Staddon
Bev Staddon, Clerk
Yavapai County Board of Supervisors

Flood Insurance

FLOOD INSURANCE

Are you without flood insurance and would like to get it? Do you currently have flood insurance, but your rates are very expensive? Did your homeowners’ policy insurance company cancel your flood insurance portion? Do you live in an area where run off coming from mesas and ridges and old washes are overflowing, and you are looking for insurance coverage? According to Brian Cosson, CFM, NFIP State Coordinator for the Arizona Department of Water Resources, “everyone is eligible to purchase flood insurance regardless of the age of the structure, because Yavapai County is in good standing with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Any structure that was permitted before August 19, 1985 is considered preFlood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) and is eligible for preFIRM rates. PreFIRM rates are approximately $400 per $100,000 in coverage. If the depth of flooding in an area is ‘only’ two (2) feet deep or so, an owner may only need $50,000 in structural coverage to cover the cost of carpet, drywall, cabinets, etc. The owner can also purchase contents insurance, which will increase the amount of the premium. Insurance can be obtained by contacting any insurance agent or by calling the National Flood Insurance Program at (800) 638-6620.”

Regarding the runoff areas Mr. Cosson states, “If the structure is located outside a Special Flood Hazard Area, the owner will most likely be eligible for the preferred risk policy, which can be as low as $250 a year.” Contact you insurance agency, then NFIP, to compare prices.

If you do not have insurance and would like to get it, contact a local agent AND the NFIP at the number above and compare prices. If you currently have insurance, contact your agent for the amount you are now paying, then call NFIP for their rate for the same coverage. You may get a better rate through NFIP. If your homeowners’ policy insurance company has dropped your flood insurance, contact another local agency, then contact NFIP and compare prices.

Visit this site www.floodsmart.gov to obtain more information on flooding insurance.

There are choices available. Take advantage of that fact and contact your sources to compare for the best price.